Loading...

Shai Shaham on creativity in science and music

Steven Lewis sat down with Dr. Shai Shaham, head of the Laboratory of Developmental Genetics at Rockefeller University, to discuss how growing up surrounded by both science and music has shaped Dr. Shaham's perspective on creativity. Research in the Shaham

By | October 11th, 2016|Categories: @RU, All Posts, Scientists of New York, Student Spotlight|0 Comments

Corbyn Nchako

“I always knew that I wanted to help heal people, so being a physician has always been my primary focus. However, when I began conducting biomedical research in college I realized how important a research scientist’s mindset and approach to scientific problem solving would be to my skills as a physician.”

By | August 15th, 2016|Categories: @RU, All Posts, Scientists of New York|Tags: |0 Comments

Latasha Wright

“When I was in high school, my science teacher, Robert Pursley, made learning science fun. He was this really eccentric person who used to do corny things like sing Christmas carols based on the periodic table. He was so enthusiastic about science that it was infectious. We used to do crazy experiments like making bubbles with gasoline and lighting them on fire. I guess I have always been curious and a bit mischievous. These characteristics came alive in chemistry class.”

By | August 5th, 2016|Categories: All Posts, RockEdu, Scientists of New York|0 Comments

#FeeltheMath: finding a balance between passion and data

By Wiley Schubert Reed Photo: Bernie Sanders Rally @ RFK Stadium in Washington D.C., by Johnathan Comer Gravitational waves exist, climate change is real, and Donald Trump is the Republican nominee for President of

By | August 3rd, 2016|Categories: Op Eds, @RU, All Posts, Student Spotlight|0 Comments

David Yap

David Yap joined the BioBus team December 2013. Born and raised in the Bay Area, California, he had a strong appreciation for the sciences instilled from his chemist father. After working part time as a lab assistant at the USDA while in high school, he attended McGill University in Montreal, studying Anthropology and Biology. Upon graduation, David spent a year teaching English in Japan and returned the United States, settling in Jersey City, NJ and freelancing as an editor of college biology textbooks. Later, he dove into the world of education reform and worked on staff at Teach For America. In 2011, David left to take part in the Occupy Wall Street protests and with a collective of artists he met at Zuccotti park, formed a worker-run screenprinting shop dedicated to creating art in public space and printing in support of social justice. David enjoys introducing students to science outside of textbooks and the classroom.

By | July 26th, 2016|Categories: All Posts, Scientists of New York|1 Comment

Phillip Geter

Can you think of a specific time when you found science or pursuing science challenging? “My second year and part of my third year in graduate school. This is where the work truly begins, when your project begins to sink or swim. Sometimes being a good scientist means knowing when to change directions and ask a different question. Well, I was at that point and I thought my project was sinking. I went through every emotion from anger to depression. I talked about my project to several people and found a solution to my problem. And just like that my dissertation was born.”

By | July 19th, 2016|Categories: All Posts, RockEdu, Scientists of New York|Tags: , |0 Comments